WORKSHOP: 16th Annual Henry Fukuhara Workshop

Photo of Easter Sierra mountain rage as viewed from Alabama Hills, CA. Photo by Al Setton.
View of Easter Sierra from Alabama Hills                                Photo by Al Setton

WORKSHOP OPPORTUNITY: I’m pleased to announced I’ve have been asked to do a watercolor demonstration at this year’s, 16th Annual outdoor Henry Fukuhara Workshop. This will be the second time I’ve had the pleasure of doing a demo (Keeler) and the third time i’ve helped with the critique process at this particular workshop. This year I’ll be doing a watercolor demo the morning of Sunday, May 19, on location at the Manzanar Interpretive Center, manzanar, CA. That same afternoon Al Setton and I will share the critique responsibilities for the day.

Based on personal workshop experience as both participant and presenter, I believe his is truly a rare opportunity to be part of a most enjoyable, entertaining, and informative event. Expect to share knowledge with 60 to 80 plus artists of all levels, beginner, intermediate, and advanced. This very economical workshop experience comes highly recommended.

So, I invite you to join us for the 16th Annual Henry Fukuhara Workshop, at Lone Pine, Alabama Hills, Manzanar, and Keeler, California, May 16 to May 20, 2013. This year’s annual event is organized by Al Setton, Shelly Pearson, Dan Dickman, and Phyllis Doyon. Join six workshop artists with over 180 years of combined artistic knowledge and practice. Bill Anderson, Joe Gibere, Woody Hansen, Willie McFarland, Al Setton, and Chris Van Winkle.

Workshop fee is $90 and includes 5 outdoor art demos and 3 indoor critiques of participant work; a workshop Meet and Greet party with the Paige Too band’ group art show at the Thousand Oaks Community Gallery, optional authentic chuck-wagon lunch served at Spanhower Ranch ($17).

Applications available at www.alsetton.com, call or (310) 663-9582. You may also contact me by my Contact Page.

To learn more about the history of Manzanar, click THIS LINK.

Photo of annual Henry Fukuhara workshop participants (left) and watercolor demonstration (right). Photos by Al Setton
Photos by Al Setton

Argo One – Original Watercolor

Original Watercolor by Woody Hansen
Watercolor Title: ARGO ONE – Original watercolor by Woody Hansen
To see a framed version of this painting or to learn more, please click image)

Watercolor chaos? Ah, yes, I see that wrinkled brow, those raise eyebrows, the wide eyes, he wrinkled nose, the look of “has he lost his marbles?” Maybe, maybe not. Argo One takes on a life of its own,  due in great part to apparent misfortune and, arguably, some degree of creative opportunity. Please read on …

This painting begins seven months ago as a sketch and value plan for a watercolor landscape. The scene depicts a small area of beach-like sand in the foreground (light shape); some rock forms in the near mid-ground (mid-values); deep, slow moving water in the far mid-ground (darkest value); and a strip of mid-value background (below).Watercolor  value plan for Argo OneMonths later, this sketch is selected as the basis for a watercolor demonstration. However, during the demo I become distracted and, unknowingly lose my way. At the time I am not aware of the error. Naïvely pleased at my progress, I stop early in the demo to allow the first layer to dry and move to other concerns of the day.

Some days later I realize the shapes, hues, and values, don’t read well. What to do?? At some point  I turn the painting upside down and become fascinated by what I see. I realize there might be an opportunity for a totally new, non-objective painting (see below)!Sketch for Argo One watercolorNow it is a problem of rearranging the composition. The process becomes increasingly enjoyable as the watercolor develops. Imagination reigns. Things are often not what they seem to be. Like the movie of the same name, an illusion based on reality. Thus, Argo.

Questions? Leave a comment here, or ar my Contact Page.  For purchase information, go HERE.

Value Plan Sequence – Example 1

This is a one-minute video illustrating the sequential development of a simple, preliminary plan or sketch using three, or four values. I find this process helpful in the effort to create an interesting painting. As seen here, he four values include white, black, and two grays. A basic, non-complex plan can go a long way in making the creative process more enjoyable.

Of course, not every painting demands the above approach, but having a plan is helpful in the effort in understanding the initial stages of a painting. To my way of thinking, one aspires to first get the shapes (design of the rectangle) right, then the values right. Once this is accomplished,there is much flexibility with regard to color and the other aspects of painting.

I discuss the value plan process in further detail during my watercolor classes and workshops
Link to class info HERE
Link to workshop info HERE.